SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA: HÖPE

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“Hope smiles from the threshold of the year to come,
Whispering ‘it will be happier’…”
Alfred Lord Tennyson
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Hang in there, the train’s comin’

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Christo Rey. Est. 1938

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On Children
by Kahlil Gibran, The Prophet 
Your children are not your children.
They are the sons and daughters of Life’s longing for itself.
They come through you but not from you,
and though they are with you, yet they belong not to you.
You may give them your love but not your thoughts,
for they have their own thoughts.
You may house their bodies but not their souls,
for their souls dwell in the house of tomorrow,
which you cannot visit, not even in your dreams.
You may strive to be like them, but seek not to make them like you,
for life goes not backward nor tarries with yesterday.
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“The longer I live, the more beautiful life becomes.” Frank Lloyd Wright
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Old Fire Station 6. Est. 1915. Now the Firehouse Museum. Located in Little Italy.

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Tin Roof Bar housed in the historic Carriage Works building, est. 1890.

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Scripps Building, est. 1907.

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Built in 1914, a designated historic site. Now houses 72 homeless veterans, at-risk youth, and ex-cons. 
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Built in 1913 and houses the Gaslamp Plaza Suites.

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Old Snyder Building, est. 1923.

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29sep19. San Diego, CA

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SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA: TREES INDEED HAVE HEARTS

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The Spreckels Theater Building was built in 1912. It was constructed to commemorate the opening of the Panama Canal. The number of seats was chosen to correspond with the Panama-California Exposition year, 1915. John D. Spreckels was a philanthropist and sugar heir.The stage was one of the largest stages ever constructed. Originally, it was only going to host live theater performances, but in 1931 it was converted to allow motion pictures. (from reading wiki)

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Old City Hall, built in 1874. Located at 5th and G Street. “This Florentine Italianate building features ornate 16-foot ceilings, 12- foot windows framed with brick arches, antique columns, and a wrought-iron cage elevator. Two floors were added in 1887 to accomodate the San Diego Public Library. In 1900, the entire city government moved in, with the Police Department on the first floor and the Council Chambers on the fourth. In 1955 stucco was applied to “modernize’ the exterior.” – https://gaslampfoundation.org/virtual-tour/old-city-hall-1874/
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1891
702 Fifth Avenue
Architect: John Stannard
Architectural Style: Mixed
The site of the current Cole Building, at the corner of Fifth Avenue and “G” Street, is one of the earliest developed properties in the area. Albert A. Cole, an early San Diego capitalist, purchased the property from Alonzo Horton in December of 1868 for $900 in gold coin.                                 The current occupant on the street level of the property is a popular sports bar, restaurant and nightclub named Whiskey Girl. According to the manager, Jerry Lopez, this lively and popular venue also appears to be haunted, as several very unusual occurrences have happened in his office late at night after closing. Additionally, before Whiskey Girl took over the venue, a manager of the previous business, La Strada, quit her job after claiming to have seen a fully manifested apparition.  https://gaslampfoundation.org/cole-block-building/
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The Golden West Hotel ~ This 1913 building is also known as the “Workingman’s Hotel.” It was built by John C. Spreckels to house work crews for the Southern Pacific Railroad, while rail lines were being laid to connect Arizona with Southern California. The Golden West Hotel’s designer was John Lloyd Wright, son of legendary architect Frank Lloyd Wright. At this time, it serves low-income patrons. – https://sandiegodowntownnews.com/the-golden-west-hotel/
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“Trees indeed have hearts.”
Henry David Thoreau
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Ralphs Grocery Company was founded in 1873 by George Albert Ralphs and Walter Benjamin Ralphs. The original store was located at Sixth and Spring Streets in Los Angeles, California. They’re popular here in San Diego. 

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The classic “Don’t Believe the Hype!” mural by Os Gemeos is STILL GOING STRONG after all of these years! Located on G street heading towards 1st.

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sep2019. San Diego, California.

BRUSSELS, BELGIUM: SMURF LOVE & “STARBUCKS ENTERPRISE”

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“The Smurfs” is a Belgian comic franchise by artist Peyo. This is street artist Space Invader’s homage to the comic in the heart of Brussels…

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Fire

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Remnants of the first city walls from the 12th or 13th century…
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from 1695, having been rebuilt…

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Knock, knock, knocking on Heaven’s door…

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Royal Theatre of the Mint. Built in 1700. Renovated three times since,  in 1856 , 1985 , and 2017.

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The coolest looking Starbucks I’ve ever seen.

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Starbucks Enterprise

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23aug19. Brussels, Belgium.

LARCHMONT, NEW YORK STREET ART: LARCHMONT HISTORICAL MURALS

Brought to us by Street Art for Mankind, a “world-first street art movement to fight child trafficking,” https://streetartmankind.org/about/, ~ is a quaint village art walk in Larchmont, New York. There are six murals depicting different aspects of Larchmont history created by internationally renowned street artists. More information is below:  

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“The Palmers, Pioneers” by BTOY a.k.a. Andrea Michaelsson, a Spanish artist who lives in Barcelona. This mural is of Samuel Palmer and his family. In 1700, Samuel Palmer, who had been elected the Town’s first supervisor in 1697, obtained the original leases on the “Middle Neck” area, and in 1722 the Palmer family obtained full title to the land which included what is now the Incorporated Village of Larchmont. (wiki) – Address: 120 Chatsworth Artist’s IG: https://www.instagram.com/btoyandrea/

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“Lucretia’s Women’s Rights” by iljin, an artist originally from Poland, now based in Dublin. LUCRETIA MOTT. “When Mott died in 1880, she was widely judged by her contemporaries… as the greatest American woman of the nineteenth century.” ~author Susan Jacoby.Lucretia Mott (née Coffin; January 3, 1793 – November 11, 1880) was a U.S. Quaker, abolitionist, women’s rights activist, and social reformer. She had formed the idea of reforming the position of women in society when she was amongst the women excluded from the World Anti-Slavery Convention in 1840. In 1848 she was invited by Jane Huntto a meeting that led to the first meeting about women’s rights. Mott helped write the Declaration of Sentiments during the 1848 Seneca Falls Convention. Her speaking abilities made her an important abolitionist, feminist, and reformer. When slavery was outlawed in 1865, she advocated giving former slaves who had been bound to slavery laws within the boundaries of the United States, whether male or female, the right to vote. She remained a central figure in the abolition and suffrage movement until her death in 1880. Mott was a Quaker preacher early in her adulthood. (wiki) Address: 47-65 Wendt Ave. Artist’s IG: https://www.instagram.com/iljin_art/

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“Mott, the Abolitionist” by KinMx a.k.a. Katherine Rupit, originally from Mexico and now lives in Dublin, Ireland. James Mott (20 June 1788 – 26 January 1868) was a Quaker leader, teacher, and merchant as well as an anti-slavery activist. (wiki) He was also the husband of Lucretia Mott. Address: 2137 Boston Post Rd. Artist’s IG: https://www.instagram.com/kinmx/

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“Rough Seas for Collins” by Victor Ash, a French artist, originally from Portugal, who now lives in Copenhagen. Edward Knight Collins I (5 August 1802 – 22 January 1878) was an American shipping magnate. Collins had the first U.S. transatlantic mail contract, built the first American steamships to cross the Atlantic and ran the fastest, most luxurious ships. He was considered to be ‘the most important person who ever lived in Larchmont,’ according to Judith Doolin Spikes, a Larchmont historian. In 1831 he became involved with the cotton trade between New Orleans and New York. He bought his first shipping line in 1831. In 1836, he launched the Dramatic Line of sailing packets, which quickly became a major presence on what was then the world’s most important shipping route, between New York and Liverpool. (wiki) Address: 6 Chatsworth Artist’s IG: https://www.instagram.com/victor__ash/

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“Munro’s Legacy” by Loic Ercolessi, a French street artist currently based in Miami, Florida. Peter Jay Munro studied law under the tutelage of Aaron Burr, the third U.S. vice president. He was also the nephew of John Jay, the president of the Continental Congress (1778 to 1779), the first U.S.  chief justice (1789 to 1795) and a governor of New York (1795 to 1801). When he was sixteen, Munro accompanied Jay to Paris to negotiate the end of the war. While practicing law in New York City, he began buying up property in Larchmont. His famous house was called Larchmont Manor (18 Elm Ave.) and it was built in 1797. It is the oldest house in Larchmont to this day. https://patch.com/new-york/larchmont/historical-wonders-the-manor-house Address: 96 Chatsworth Artist’s IG: https://www.instagram.com/loicercolessi/

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“The Vibrant Manor” by Jo Di Bona, a French street artist living in Paris. “In the 1910s and 20s, actors Mary Pickford and Douglas Fairbanks summered in Larchmont when it was a summer colony for rich city dwellers.” http://theloopny.com/hollywood-on-the-long-island-sound/ Address: 145 Larchmont, back parking lot. Artist’s IG: https://www.instagram.com/jodibona/

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12nov18. Larchmont, NY. 

ŁÓDŹ (pronounced “WOODGE”), POLAND 🇵🇱: “I AM ANOTHER”

Freedom fighter Tadeusz Kościuszko. Pl. Wolności (Freedom Square.)

WASK.

“I am another.”

“We are under protection, i.e. defenseless.”

Alexander Nevsky Cathedral ~ An Orthodox Church built at the end of the 19th century. The Cathedral was financed by the most prominent factory owners at that time, Karl Scheibler, Izrael Poznanski and Luliusz Kunitzer (none of whom were actually Orthodox Christians), to celebrate the miraculous survival of Russian Emperor Alexander II from an assassination attempt in 1879. (Poland was a part of Russia at the time). https://theculturetrip.com/europe/poland/articles/the-top-10-things-to-do-and-see-in-lodz/

16sep18. Lodz, Poland 🇵🇱

WARSAW, POLAND 🇵🇱: THE “ANCHOR”

The anchor emblem seen on walls throughout the city, indicate significant locations for the Uprising of 1944. More information below the next photo.

So what does an anchor have to do with fighting Nazis?  The Kotwica is actually more than an anchor, as the figure is an amalgam of the letters P and W, which take on a number of meanings when associated with the Polish Home Army’s (AK) fight to retake Warsaw.  Starting in 1942, members of the Polish underground “Wawer Minor” sabotage unit started using “PW” to signify “Pomścimy Wawer” (“We Shall Avenge Wawer”).  The Wawer Massacre of December 26-27, 1939 was one of the first massacres of Poles in occupied Poland, and its memory fueled the opposition in Warsaw.  The meaning of “PW” was soon expanded to include “Polska Walcząca” (“Fighting Poland”).

“PW” increasingly appeared in the city as a “signature” on acts of resistance and sabotage; and in 1942 the AK put out a call to design an emblem that could be easily printed.  A design that combined the P and W into an anchor – the Kotwica – was submitted by Anna Smoleńska (code name “Hania”) and was chosen as the symbol of the underground.  Smoleńska, an art history student at the underground University of Warsaw, was arrested in November of 1942 and died in Auschwitz in March 1943 at the age of 23.  Thought she did not live to see an independent Warsaw, the symbol she created endured though the war and beyond. https://culture.pl/en/article/decoding-warsaw-a-guide-to-the-citys-sights-and-symbols

Why the “Mermaid of Warsaw?”

One legend claims “long, long ago” two sirens swam from the Atlantic Ocean to the Baltic Sea.  One sister stopped in the Danish straits and can to this day be seen by those visiting the port of Copenhagen.  The other sister (clearly the one with more discerning taste) kept swimming until she reached Gdansk, where she then turned to follow the Wisla into the heart of Poland.  Reaching what is today Warsaw, she decided she had found a home and stopped at the shore to rest.  It wasn’t long after her arrival that local fishermen began noticing someone was tangling their nets and releasing the fish.  Though it meant a loss of livelihood, the fishermen were so enchanted by the siren’s song that they never caught her.  That is, until a wealthy merchant realized he could make a profit showing off the siren at fairs.  He captured the Wisla siren and locked her away in a shed.  The siren’s plaintive cries were heard by a young farmhand, who with the help of his friends, returned her to the river.  Grateful to her rescuers, the siren vowed to help them in times of need.  The siren of Warsaw is thus armed, waiting with sword and shield to make good on her promise and defend the city.

A second tale again highlights the mermaid as the armed defender of the city, though with a different origin story.  This one claims that “in ancient times” a griffin defended the city.  The griffin would often accompany local fishermen to the Baltic, and on one such journey he spotted a mermaid.  It was love at first sight, and the mythical pair returned to live happily in Warsaw – until the griffin was mortally wounded during the Swedish invasion.  As the siege of Warsaw raged around her, the mermaid picked up the arms of her dying lover and joined the defense of the city.  In gratitude of her service and sacrifice, the people of Warsaw honored her by placing her image on the city’s coat of arms. https://culture.pl/en/article/decoding-warsaw-a-guide-to-the-citys-sights-and-symbols

Warsaw Spire.

Sigismund’s Column (Polish: Kolumna Zygmunta), originally erected in 1644, is located in Castle Square, Warsaw, Poland and is one of Warsaw‘s most famous landmarks. The column and statue commemorate King Sigismund III Vasa, who in 1596 had moved Poland‘s capital from Kraków to Warsaw.(Wiki)

Presidential Palace. Construction started in 1643. Bertel Thorvaldsen‘s statue of Prince Józef Poniatowski in front.

The Royal Castle in Warsaw (Polish: Zamek Królewski w Warszawie) is a castle residency that formerly served throughout the centuries as the official residence of the Polish monarchs. It is located in the Castle Square, at the entrance to the Warsaw Old Town. The personal offices of the king and the administrative offices of the Royal Court of Poland were located there from the sixteenth century until the Partitions of Poland.(Wiki)

The Stadium.

Old Town.

13-15sep18. Warsaw Poland 🇵🇱

LAHORE , PAKISTAN 🇵🇰: LAHORE FORT

The Lahore Fort (Punjabi and Urdu: شاہی قلعہ‎: Shahi Qila, or “Royal Fort”), is a citadel. It is notable for having been almost entirely rebuilt in the 17th century, when the Mughal Empire was at the height of its splendour and opulence. The foundations of the modern Lahore Fort date to 1566 during the reign of Emperor Akbar. In 1981, the fort was inscribed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lahore_Fort

7jul18 Lahore, Pakistan 🇵🇰

Iași , Romania : Lost Lyrics

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Residential building with commercial shop below.
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Cow herder in a field.
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1+1=1 behind bars. Ache77. https://www.instagram.com/ache77stencilartist/
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Lost lyrics: “sunflower fields forever.”

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Built into the wall
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Church in a field. 
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Trolley
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Movie theater

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The Alexandru Ioan Cuza University (Romanian: Universitatea „Alexandru Ioan Cuza”; acronym: UAIC) is a public university. Founded one year after the establishment of the Romanian state, by an 1860 decree of Prince Alexandru Ioan Cuza, under whom the former Academia Mihăileană was converted to a university, the University of Iași, as it was named at first, is the oldest university of Romania, and one of its advanced research and education institutions. (wiki)

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View from above

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23/24jun2018. Iași, Romania.

Chișinău , Moldova: The Central Cemetery a.k.a. The Armenian Cemetery

Founded in 1811. It’s the most ‘honored’ cemetery in Chișinău. Many nobles alongside regular citizens. It’s falling to decay, as it’s so massive, but there’s constantly work being done by groundskeepers. Walking through it, I was struck by two things that are not common in American cemeteries: Pictures of the deceased prominently displayed on the tombstones, really ‘putting a face with the corpse’ for me. Which, I never knew I needed. Sounds creepy, but it was kind of wild to see the face of someone who was born and who died before I ever came to be. Just gently putting into perspective that life goes on with or without us. We’re so small in relative terms. Secondly, the tables that were on the grave sites. Some were as long as picnic tables. Others were small little cafe-like tables that were obviously meant for visitors to come and sit. A Ukrainian friend explained that once a year there’s a special day where families come and visit their beloveds’ graves…drink and eat, and share stories of their lives. An effort to keep their spirits alive, I guess. 

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Reminiscent of the Grapes of Wrath

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Who WERE they?! What were they LIKE?!

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An especially elaborate table at a grave site

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What happened?

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16jun18 Chișinău , Moldova