INSTAGRAMMED MEXICO CITY

Sometimes when I’m photographing things, the environments I find myself alone in are precarious to say the least. I don’t want to risk a situation where I could get mugged and my camera stolen. So, on those occasions, I use my small iPOD touch. I love Instagram and I’m finding that my latest images have required aspect touches of Sutro, Sierra, Hefe, Amaro, Mayfair, Rise, and even Nashville. I no longer just use the Lo-fi or the Earlybird. The more I work with the variety of aspects, the more satisfied I am with my photos. Now, the iPOD Touch camera isn’t nearly as good as the iPAD3’s, but again, it’s one of those situations where I don’t want to bring any attention to myself when I’m alone and not real familiar with the environment.

I sometimes do separate posts of the same image with either the Canon or the iPOD. The results are so different that you don’t realize you’re looking at the same thing or you don’t really care because the aesthetics are pleasing both ways. They are the same, but different. 🙂 I don’t like the idea of Instagram being viewed as the wicked stepsister or the lowly ‘Plan B.’ It really does provide beautiful and interesting shots, as well as allows me to keep some spontaneity by going through the ‘aspects’ and discovering the right one for that particular image.

I’ll keep working with Instagram for sure and soon will get into Hipstamatic a lot more. Hipstamatic has so many different lenses and types of films, that it takes patience to find the right combinations. But when I do get the right combo, it’s a really pleasing result. Below are some Instagram images of Mexico City:

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I don’t usually do this; take pictures of homeless people, but I found this to be quite poignant and you don’t see a person. Poignant because I’m used to seeing someone just lying on a piece of cardboard, exposed to the elements, seemingly passed out, no longer self-conscious of their plight. But these, especially the one on the right, (it) has been transformed into like a little hut and the cross is placed over it, allowing these people to stake some temporary claim to shelter. This was on Avenida Argentina in Historico Centro and it was a little after 7am. The streets were still empty for the most part, so these little makeshift ‘houses’ stayed up for a little while longer. When I returned in the early afternoon, the sleeping spots were cleared and the cross was gone. It makes me imagine the people inside building them up and taking them down (with the cross) every day. And their situation is not lost on me.

ImageImageImageImageCarlos Sinuhe, a 33-year old student and activist, was gunned down outside his apartment building in Mexico City in 2011. There have been no leads as to who may have shot him 11-15 times. It appears write-ups have Mexican citizens considering it another murder by a drug cartel and are getting more and more pissed off at the obvious inaction of the government and law enforcement.

Image“La suerte esta echada”: The die has been cast by French artist, Claire Becker

ImageThe city’s trying to go green.

ImageImageImageJose Parti, Cuban national hero, a  prolific writer, considered a symbol for Cuba’s independence from Spain in the 19th century.

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Jose Vasconcelos, a huge influence on public education and the arts in Mexico.

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Image3JAN13. Mexico City,Mexico.

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IMAGES OF MEXICO CITY IN THE EARLY PART OF THE DAY

Like I’ve said, I hadn’t really slept (still haven’t and I’m in Caracas now) since Tuesday morning… and Thursday morning is when I found myself walking the streets of Mexico City, my first time ever visiting. It was all just really big cathedrals and plazas and people waking up and opening their markets…The sky was more white than blue for the most part of the afternoon…here’s what I saw and maybe in a few days (and a few sleeps) I’ll understand it.

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3JAN13. Mexico City, Mexico.