LARCHMONT, NEW YORK STREET ART: LARCHMONT HISTORICAL MURALS

Brought to us by Street Art for Mankind, a “world-first street art movement to fight child trafficking,” https://streetartmankind.org/about/, ~ is a quaint village art walk in Larchmont, New York. There are six murals depicting different aspects of Larchmont history created by internationally renowned street artists. More information is below:  

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“The Palmers, Pioneers” by BTOY a.k.a. Andrea Michaelsson, a Spanish artist who lives in Barcelona. This mural is of Samuel Palmer and his family. In 1700, Samuel Palmer, who had been elected the Town’s first supervisor in 1697, obtained the original leases on the “Middle Neck” area, and in 1722 the Palmer family obtained full title to the land which included what is now the Incorporated Village of Larchmont. (wiki) – Address: 120 Chatsworth Artist’s IG: https://www.instagram.com/btoyandrea/

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“Lucretia’s Women’s Rights” by iljin, an artist originally from Poland, now based in Dublin. LUCRETIA MOTT. “When Mott died in 1880, she was widely judged by her contemporaries… as the greatest American woman of the nineteenth century.” ~author Susan Jacoby.Lucretia Mott (née Coffin; January 3, 1793 – November 11, 1880) was a U.S. Quaker, abolitionist, women’s rights activist, and social reformer. She had formed the idea of reforming the position of women in society when she was amongst the women excluded from the World Anti-Slavery Convention in 1840. In 1848 she was invited by Jane Huntto a meeting that led to the first meeting about women’s rights. Mott helped write the Declaration of Sentiments during the 1848 Seneca Falls Convention. Her speaking abilities made her an important abolitionist, feminist, and reformer. When slavery was outlawed in 1865, she advocated giving former slaves who had been bound to slavery laws within the boundaries of the United States, whether male or female, the right to vote. She remained a central figure in the abolition and suffrage movement until her death in 1880. Mott was a Quaker preacher early in her adulthood. (wiki) Address: 47-65 Wendt Ave. Artist’s IG: https://www.instagram.com/iljin_art/

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“Mott, the Abolitionist” by KinMx a.k.a. Katherine Rupit, originally from Mexico and now lives in Dublin, Ireland. James Mott (20 June 1788 – 26 January 1868) was a Quaker leader, teacher, and merchant as well as an anti-slavery activist. (wiki) He was also the husband of Lucretia Mott. Address: 2137 Boston Post Rd. Artist’s IG: https://www.instagram.com/kinmx/

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“Rough Seas for Collins” by Victor Ash, a French artist, originally from Portugal, who now lives in Copenhagen. Edward Knight Collins I (5 August 1802 – 22 January 1878) was an American shipping magnate. Collins had the first U.S. transatlantic mail contract, built the first American steamships to cross the Atlantic and ran the fastest, most luxurious ships. He was considered to be ‘the most important person who ever lived in Larchmont,’ according to Judith Doolin Spikes, a Larchmont historian. In 1831 he became involved with the cotton trade between New Orleans and New York. He bought his first shipping line in 1831. In 1836, he launched the Dramatic Line of sailing packets, which quickly became a major presence on what was then the world’s most important shipping route, between New York and Liverpool. (wiki) Address: 6 Chatsworth Artist’s IG: https://www.instagram.com/victor__ash/

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“Munro’s Legacy” by Loic Ercolessi, a French street artist currently based in Miami, Florida. Peter Jay Munro studied law under the tutelage of Aaron Burr, the third U.S. vice president. He was also the nephew of John Jay, the president of the Continental Congress (1778 to 1779), the first U.S.  chief justice (1789 to 1795) and a governor of New York (1795 to 1801). When he was sixteen, Munro accompanied Jay to Paris to negotiate the end of the war. While practicing law in New York City, he began buying up property in Larchmont. His famous house was called Larchmont Manor (18 Elm Ave.) and it was built in 1797. It is the oldest house in Larchmont to this day. https://patch.com/new-york/larchmont/historical-wonders-the-manor-house Address: 96 Chatsworth Artist’s IG: https://www.instagram.com/loicercolessi/

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“The Vibrant Manor” by Jo Di Bona, a French street artist living in Paris. “In the 1910s and 20s, actors Mary Pickford and Douglas Fairbanks summered in Larchmont when it was a summer colony for rich city dwellers.” http://theloopny.com/hollywood-on-the-long-island-sound/ Address: 145 Larchmont, back parking lot. Artist’s IG: https://www.instagram.com/jodibona/

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12nov18. Larchmont, NY. 

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9 thoughts on “LARCHMONT, NEW YORK STREET ART: LARCHMONT HISTORICAL MURALS

  1. Beautiful photography and so interesting to know the rich history of those despicted on these walls. Awesome art. Thank you Jackie for sharing the stories behind the faces. Incredible people to encourage us to be better people.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Some actually relate to Larchmont, but they are huge, the woman in the one next to The Corner Store looks most unfriendly, and, beauty being in the eyes of the beholder, the whole thing reminds me of the sides of NYC subway cars in the 1960s, only bigger and even more out of place.

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    1. Thanks for scrolling through the post and I hope that an appreciation of street art will take hold as you are exposed to more of it. 🙂 Commissioned murals are a far cry from NYC subway cars of the distant past… 🙂

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    1. I’d imagine that the two villages of Larchmont and Mamaroneck (Mamaroneck Township/Larchmont area) seemed intrinsically linked and the Motts lived at the Mill House on Pryer Manor Road for some time. Judith Doolin wrote a book that you can check out.

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