NEW YORK CITY: SCULPTURAL BEAUTY

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“JEAN-MARC, 2012” (A Portrait of the artist Jean-Marc Bustamante) by Xavier Veilhan
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Venus de Milo sculptures by Jim Dine on 6th Avenue

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Opened on December 27, 1932

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Cuban patriot and author Jose Marti. Sculptor: Anna Vaughn Hyatt Huntington. Location: Central Park South at Avenue of the Americas. Dedicated to the park in May 1965.
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World War 1, 107th Infantry Honored in Central Park.
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William Tecumseh Sherman, also known as the Sherman Memorial or Sherman Monument, is an outdoor sculpture of William Tecumseh Sherman by Augustus Saint-Gaudens, located at Grand Army Plaza in Manhattan, New York. Cast in 1902 and dedicated on May 30, 1903, the gilded-bronze monument consists of an equestrian statue and an allegorical female figure, Victory. Sherman was a bright military mind who served as a general in the Union Army. Saint-Gardens was an American sculptor (born in Dublin, Ireland) who gained notoriety for his sculptures of the Civil War. Victory is the Greek goddess Nike. 

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September 2017

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5 thoughts on “NEW YORK CITY: SCULPTURAL BEAUTY

  1. The Venus sculptures bring to my mind Ovid’s Metamorphoses, in which all kinds of mythical beings change into something else. These are great-

    I find the WWI-statue quite kitschy. The style is ideological, reminiscent of things like socialist realism, for example. It therefore fails its purpose of honoring those who fought and died in the war, by presenting (or pretending) a clean-shaven picture off what actually was pure horror for all involved. You can see it is a lie and because of that, it insults them instead of honoring them (at least that is what I think about this type of sculpture).

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Interesting take on it. That’s not what I see. The actual sculptor who designed it literally served in this unit as a sergeant. And amongst the seven men, the three front men are charging and on the offense, two to the left are preparing to launch a grenade and the two to the right depict one man carrying a wounded comrade. I guess, for me, the ‘seven’ represent the overall experience, and especially as the sculptor himself had such intimate knowledge of the unit, I have to feel that quite a bit of it is genuine. As for ‘clean-shaven,’ that was much more the style at the time for American men, as opposed to say, the Civil War, which definitely allowed for longer hair and beards, goatees, etc…

      Liked by 1 person

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