TYRE, LEBANON: “JESUS VISITED”

ImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImageImage

It is stated in the Bible that Jesus visited the “coasts” of Tyre and Sidon and healed a Gentile (Matthew 15:21; Mark 7:24) and from this region many came forth to hear him preaching (Mark 3:8; Gospel of Luke 6:17, Matthew 11:21–23). A congregation was founded here soon after the death of Saint Stephen, and Paul of Tarsus, on his return from his third missionary journey, spent a week in conversation with the disciples there. According to Irenaeus of Lyons in Adversus Haereses, the female companion of Simon Magus came from here.

After a first failed siege in 1111, it was captured by the Crusaders in 1124, becoming one of the most important cities of the Kingdom of Jerusalem. It was part of the royal domain, although there were also autonomous trading colonies there for the Italian merchant cities. The city was the site of the archbishop of Tyre, a suffragan of the Latin Patriarch of Jerusalem; its archbishops often acceded to the Patriarchate. The most notable of the Latin archbishops was the historian William of Tyre.

After the reconquest of Acre by King Richard on July 12, 1191, the seat of the kingdom moved there, but coronations were held in Tyre. In the 13th century, Tyre was separated from the royal domain as a separate crusader lordship. In 1291, it was retaken by the Mameluks which then was followed by Ottoman rule before the modern state of Lebanon was declared in 1920. (wiki)

28JUL13. Tyre, Lebanon.

5 thoughts on “TYRE, LEBANON: “JESUS VISITED”

  1. After all those wars and probably several earthquakes, it is astonishing these columns are still standing. Again I feel the special beauty of decaying things in these ruins, resulting from a mix of order and disorder.

    1. It IS remarkable. I’m so glad you appreciate that. When the PLO had this as a base during the 2006 conflict, I believe, it IS astonishing that these columns are still standing. You can even see mosaics on the ‘floors…’ quite beaten up, but still there…I always stand at these kinds of places and try to envision them when their marble was shiny and glossy, their floors pristine…amazing, time…

      1. Here in cologne, there is a “Roman German Museum” with things from that time. They also have a remarkable mosaic floor right there inside the museum (in its original location, as far as I know). Hope your next photo series will be from Colgne. I could show you some nice graffiti and wall art here as well 🙂

  2. Yes! The mosaics that they could transefre into the National Museum in Beirut, they did, but the ones that were just in pieces…they allowed to remain on the actual grounds. I LOVE Cologne! You say “Koln,” yes?

  3. Yes! The mosaics that they could transfer into the National Museum in Beirut, they did, but the ones that were just in pieces…they allowed to remain on the actual grounds. I LOVE Cologne! You say “Koln,” yes?

Leave a Reply to nannus Cancel reply